Recommended Reading: Health Insurance

These two articles demonstrate how confusion around health insurance is beginning to play out:

Coronavirus survival comes with a $1.1 million, 181-page price tag

I Didn’t Have to Pay a Penny of My $320,000 COVID-19 Hospital Bill. Is That a Good Thing?


This article, “When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again,” helped me in my own decision making about partaking in these activities, now and in the future.

Recommended Reading: Preparing for Telemedicine Appointments

This local institution had already been using Open Notes to document and share physician notes with patients. Now, they have taken it a step further with a wonderful project to help patients prepare for telemedicine appointments. Read more here.


Surgeon and best-selling author Atul Gawande offers lessons for re-opening from places that never locked down to begin with: hospitals.

His four-point approach is a “combination therapy,” and includes elements with which we are all familiar: hygiene measures, screening, distancing and masks. Culture is the fifth (and arguably the most difficult) pillar of a new combination therapy to stop the coronavirus.


Those who overcome adversity understand that while there is a lot they cannot control, they can — and should — pay attention disproportionately to those things within their area of influence.

Learn more in this terrific interview with Angela Duckworth , author of “Grit.”

Recommended: Modeling the Way

Modeling the Way

Over the course of his life, my dad has donated blood 171 times! We think it’s what keeps him “young” and healthy.

He reminded me it was something incredibly important that I could do right now, so I gave last week. (By appointment only!)

Here are local resources if you would like to do the same:

MA Red Cross Blood Donation
RI Blood Center


During this crisis, I’ve worked hard with my parents in Florida to achieve success at FaceTime calling as well as to help them access Netflix and On Demand programming.

Some of our clients, however, live alone and without a smart phone. This article addresses the issue with some great suggestions.


This article made me wonder: Can the clinical practices that are being followed to treat this disease, and the newly emerging public health policies, keep up with how things are evolving?

Recommended Reading: Connection

Psychologist Natasha Tiwari explains that we are hardwired to touch our faces and offers some suggestions for how to alter those behaviors.


Before I chose the topic for this month’s newsletter, I had already planned to share the following article. Now, it seems even more relevant.

Anyone who knows me is aware that I am all about connection. For the past two years, my New Year’s resolution has involved reconnecting with important individuals in my life. I made a list and I’m pleased to report that I have made great progress and experienced incredible joy by reconnecting with these people.

With that in mind, I happily share some great reading regarding the health benefits of strong friendships! Read more, here.

Recommended Reading: Changing Times

In these changing times, and with daily advances in methods of communication, I was intrigued by this article about physicians who, via tiktok, are attempting to influence young people on the topic of sex education. It seems sharing hard copy books is no longer the only option!


We develop our own standards in deciding which candidates to back in an election. For me, support of the Affordable Care Act is critical and, in particular, the protection it affords for those with pre-existing conditions. In my eyes, the loss of this would be horrific. So yes, I am trying to influence others on this topic! More here.


At Healthassistwe try to think about how clients will be using the healthcare system in the future. I loved reading how this futurist looks at the next decade in healthcare.

Seven for the Twenties: A Futurist Looks at the Next Decade