Recommended Reading: Managing Major Illness and Insurance

Many of our clients are forced to deal with both a major illness as well as the administrative burden of managing their insurance. This article highlights that unfortunate reality.


As professionals who guide Medicare recipients through administrative barriers experienced when accessing care, we found this article very disturbing.


This was a moving piece about the impact of depression and the importance of friendship.

Recommended Reading: Paid Leave

I appreciated this recent commentary regarding paid leave and the caring of the older adults in our lives. Click here to read.


I remain committed to Simmons University for so many reasons, one of which is the university’s research on gender in organizations.

For example, at the last four women’s leadership conferences I attended, “men allyship” was a subject of discussion. This important topic has gained much visibility, both as a role that individual men take up, as well as an organizational strategy for enhancing gender equity. Take a look at some recent findings, here.

Recommended Reading: Rare Diseases

My friend and colleague Sue Nemetz is President of The NemetzGroup, a life sciences commercial and strategy advisory firm. Recently, TNG published a fascinating newsletter about rare diseases and the development of medicines to treat them.

“Rare diseases (AKA, ‘orphan diseases’) are unlike any other. For a host of reasons — not the least of which is the human toll these take on those afflicted and their families — the discovery, development, and commercialization of medicines in this area needs to be approached in ways that are different than what one might do with more established diseases affecting much larger populations.”

Read the entire piece here.

Recommended Reading: Atul Gawande

In a recent article, Atul Gawande reflects on technology/electronic medical record systems and their impact on the physician patient relationship:

“And yet it’s perfectly possible to envisage a system that makes care ever better for those who receive it and ever more miserable for those who provide it.”

“We can retune and streamline our systems, but we won’t find a magical sweet spot between competing imperatives. We can only ensure that people always have the ability to turn away from their screens and see each other, colleague to colleague, clinician to patient, face to face.”

Recommended Reading: Working Beyond Age 65

Although there are general rules surrounding Medicare enrollment, if you and/or your spouse remain working beyond the age of 65, the timing for enrollment in Medicare Parts A and B has some nuance to it. In addition, if you remain working and contribute to a Health Savings Account (HSA), there may be tax implications.

As always, a customized assessment of your unique situation and that of your spouse is critical to making the right decisions at the right time.

This article discusses some of the issues.


This article provides insight on speaking with your employer if you are over the age of 65 and remain working.


Finally, I’m often asked if I recommend HMO plans through the ACA marketplace or through Medicare Advantage Plans for Medicare recipients. My standard answer is, “It depends on individual circumstances.”

Overall, my goal for individuals choosing these plans is for them to fully appreciate the guidelines and restrictions involved. This allows them to work within them and to anticipate and budget for out-of-pocket costs that will occur as care is accessed.

More on this topic, here.